Dr. Kamil Idris Addresses Intellectual Property Laws Co-habitating With Globalization

In 2002, Dr. Kamil Idris wrote the introduction to the Fordham International Law Journal’s volume 26 number 2 issue. The issue asserted intellectual property’s role in the international law dialogue. Idris explained how intellectual property laws prevails a nation’s capacity for creative and intellectual growth. Kamil Idris is an expert on the matter of intellectual content and the international laws that protect it. Idris was Director General of the United Nation’s (UN) World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) from 1997 to 2008. Idris was only the third person to serve as as Director of the WIPO since its beginning in 1967. Dr. Kamil Idris was born in Sudan and obtained his honorary degree from the University of Geneva in Switzerland in 1984 . While attending Khartoum University during 1977 in Cairo for his Bachelor’s in arts, Idris became acquainted with foreign affairs through the university’s foreign law ministry. Soon after, the ministry employed him inside the United Nations Sudanese branch. He fulfilled his expertise by joining as a member of Group of 77, an African UN delegation addressing limitations placed upon the technological, environmental and occupational transport of goods between developing nations.

In an interview with Venture Outsource, Dr. Kamil Idris spoke on the present status of globalization blurring the lines for national intellectual growth. Idris outlined national laws and objectives as a preface for determining the effect of globalization on a particular country’s intellectual growth. Next, he stated the issues most prevalent for the WIPO. Idris mentions the internet’s borderless state as a perpetratror of intellectual property infringement. Piracy is also an increased dissolution of intellectual propety as a result of the web. However, the WIPO is slowly catching up with its development. Dr. Kamil Idris says the WIPO is implementing its own patent data into the internet to administer infringements. Idris proposed a global patent agreement in order to expediate the patent integration process cast down by patent discrepancy between countries. Economic value has been one of the greatest forces in nations recognizing the advantage of intellectual property laws. Though, he did not want to address the U.S’s restrictive patent system in opposition to developing countries’ pass on regulations, Idris did state his own interpretation of the intellectual property doctrine. He suggests looking at the interest of both the makers and the civil society for administering a fair trade of intellectual property.

Buy his latest book here:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Books-Kamil-Idris/s?ie=UTF8&page=1&rh=n%3A266239%2Cp_27%3AKamil%20Idris

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